what's next?

v2 of simple d3 with Meteor – now rendering individual records

In Uncategorized on June 8, 2013 at 3:17 pm

simplest d3 + meteor example I could make v2

steve/simple-d3-with-meteor · GitHub.

Learning meteor & d3 together – I wanted a simple example to build on. Since I didn’t find one, I’m sharing this. The minimal (for me) was that it took advantage of the reactive data synced between client & server to affect something I drew with d3.

Now, individual circles are drawn by d3 (via a template), each one as a result of individual record changes managed by Meteor. This is more like what (I think) Meteor intended, as it’s much closer to how HTML is created by Meteor templates. One difference, the removal of something from d3 is triggered by use of a callback from observing the Things collection.

  • Add & remove records in “Things” collection using the “+” and “-” buttons
  • Each record in the “Things” collection will be shown as a circle, with the “name” attribute as the text inside of the circle.

screenshot

 

Simplest d3 + meteor example I could make

In Product Development on June 6, 2013 at 4:04 am

Learning meteor & d3 together – I wanted a simple example to build on. Since I didn’t find one, I’m sharing this.  The minimal (for me) was that it took advantage of the reactive data synced between client & server to affect something I drew with d3.

steve/simple-d3-with-meteor · GitHub.

Thanks to the following sources for their help

SNAP! – Programming for Kids

In Uncategorized on April 15, 2013 at 2:07 am

SNAP! (Build Your Own Blocks).

We’ve had great fun, and results, teaching kids to program with Scratch. Now, Berkeley has “an extended reimplementation of Scratch … that allows you to Build Your Own Blocks. It also features first class lists, first class procedures, and continuations. These added capabilities make it suitable for a serious introduction to computer science for high school or college students.”

I’ve only played with it a little – but getting started with Snap! is even easier than Scratch – because it’s browser-based (i.e. written in  Javascript  and designed to run in the browser).

You can try it right away and it’s worth it – even if you’re not a kid.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 716 other followers